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I'm a QA Tech at a software development studio. I play a lot of video games. I love reading about game design, gaming industry news, topics in computing science and the occasional lolcat. You should expect me to blog about all of the above.

http://twitter.com/jobias
XBL GamerTag: jobiasRKD

jessicalprice:

vixyish:

yondamoegi:

dreamsofjade:

hoganddice:

captkylej:

themaskednegro:

bowiesnippleantennae:

whatarefrogs:

JonTron just linked this image as an example of how men are stereotyped and exploited in video games I’m literally laughing out loud holy shit

for anyone who still doesn’t get it notice the background please

Fun fact: topless slave girls are COLLECTIBLES in this game.

See, the problem is that the guys objectification is empowering. You’re empowered because you’re taking advantage of the other objectified people.

Also, can my followers who like guys please comment on whether or not they find this guy sexually attractive?

nah, too much muscle. Muscle is hard… I want something soft to rest my head on! :P the only guy that i’ve ever been attracted to who has looked like this is Jason Momoa. 

I personally like muscles. I adore them. They fascinate me.
But this Conan doesn’t look sexually attractive. He looks like he’s gonna kill me - he’s intimidating and forceful. I’d better stay away from him.
If he looked like this
I’d say “Well, hello sexy.”
Objectification and sexualization don’t really depend on character’s looks, even if they use it to objectificate and sexualize. They depend on character’s purpose and agency.
A girl character can run around with her titties exposed but still could be not sexualized.

Just my 2 cents

ALL OF THIS.

Looks like it’s time for cynixy's guide to video game false equivalence again! 
http://www.annamegill.com/blog/2013/12/10/a-brief-guide-to-video-game-character-sexualization

jessicalprice:

vixyish:

yondamoegi:

dreamsofjade:

hoganddice:

captkylej:

themaskednegro:

bowiesnippleantennae:

whatarefrogs:

JonTron just linked this image as an example of how men are stereotyped and exploited in video games I’m literally laughing out loud holy shit

for anyone who still doesn’t get it notice the background please

Fun fact: topless slave girls are COLLECTIBLES in this game.

See, the problem is that the guys objectification is empowering. You’re empowered because you’re taking advantage of the other objectified people.

Also, can my followers who like guys please comment on whether or not they find this guy sexually attractive?

nah, too much muscle. Muscle is hard… I want something soft to rest my head on! :P the only guy that i’ve ever been attracted to who has looked like this is Jason Momoa. 

I personally like muscles. I adore them. They fascinate me.

But this Conan doesn’t look sexually attractive. He looks like he’s gonna kill me - he’s intimidating and forceful. I’d better stay away from him.

If he looked like this

I’d say “Well, hello sexy.”

Objectification and sexualization don’t really depend on character’s looks, even if they use it to objectificate and sexualize. They depend on character’s purpose and agency.

A girl character can run around with her titties exposed but still could be not sexualized.

Just my 2 cents

ALL OF THIS.

Looks like it’s time for cynixy's guide to video game false equivalence again! 

http://www.annamegill.com/blog/2013/12/10/a-brief-guide-to-video-game-character-sexualization

nateswinehart:

Being good to each other is so important, guys.

Obtaining Feedback from Gamers - How we do it

askagamedev:

So I got some responses to my last post about Understanding the Angry Gamer. Aside from the expected results, one recurring note that stood out was that sometimes developers are in the wrong, that we have made mistakes, and that we should listen. I totally agree in that we developers are sometimes wrong, that we make mistakes, and that we should listen. However, that brings up a rather important question: “Who should we be listening to?”

image

The answer, of course, is everyone. So today, in a special Labor Day weekend edition of AAGD, we can examine how developers get and parse feedback.

Read More

More people need to be aware of this. An interesting corollary: If someone says something is amiss, they are almost always right. But if someone has an idea on how to fix it, they are almost always wrong.

sandandglass:

Daily Show correspondent Michael Che tries to find a safe place to report from.

ladyverene:

starspunade:

sihmah:

to recap: 

Straight male pc – cass, josephine

Straight female pc – iron bull, Cullen

Gay female pc – sera Josephine

Gay male pc  – dorian iron bull

Bi male pc – Josephine, cass, iron bull, dorian

Bi female pc - Josephine sera, iron bull, cullen

YOU LITERALLY HAVE THE SAME AMOUNT OF OPTIONS AS EVERYONE ELSE RIGHT NOW????????

Haven’t there been studies that show that if you put something like 70% men and 30% women in a room, the men will perceive it as more than half the room being women? Seems to apply to this as well, in a way…

Can’t find a link to the study so I might just be making things up though D: My Google-fu is weak.

I’ve heard of those studies, too. It was something like guys will think there’s equal representation when it’s actually about 15/85, and women are speaking the majority of the time when it’s actually 30/70. Ridiculous.

Developer Pet Peeves: Grandma's Boy 

askagamedev:

I’m going to go a little further afield today for a different topic. Every now and then, some common myth or other thing will annoy me. I’m usually a pretty mild person, but some things just make me want to roll my eyes and shake my head. Suggestions to watch the movie…

Game Development Myths: It’s the Publisher’s Fault!

askagamedev:

One of the most prevailing myths about game development that I’ve heard time and time again is the misattribution of who is actually the driving force behind certain decisions for a game. I hear it most often about Electronic Arts as a publisher, but I also hear it about other publishers like Activision, Ubisoft, Square-Enix, Microsoft, Sony, Capcom, Konami, and have heard it about practically every other publisher at some point. The myth, of course, is some version of this:

  • I hate X. <Publisher> must have forced <Developer> to do it!
  • I love Y. I’m so glad that <Developer> managed to slip Y past <Publisher>!

image

Read More

the-goddamazon:

LOL man.

(Source: romancingalbion)

http://ungaming.tumblr.com/post/95872753745/this-is-the-story-of-a-music-journalist-he-was-a 

ungaming:

This is the story of a music journalist. He was a pretty successful music journalist. He had an ostensibly full-time gig at a pretty mainstream outlet. The pay wasn’t great but it was enough to live on, and he was pretty thrilled he got to write about music for a living. He worked from home,…

I partly blame Kotaku for implementing this policy. But I blame the readers who pressured them to adopt it even more.

Anonymous said: I remember the days when games were about worlds you could explore and about being good, and not about who's got representation and gender this and sexuality that. I miss those days.

dgaider:

Those days miss you, too. I recently found a yellowed letter under one of the floorboards, and it was addressed to you and signed by those days with a tear-stained kiss of lipstick.

Meanwhile, in the present, those of us who work in the industry and who are—amazingly—able to consider more than one idea at the same time, will continue to create good games about worlds you can explore AND occasionally talk about inclusivity.

If you are feeling compassion fatigue, I think it might be okay to sit out those discussions, at least until you get your strength back. While it will be tough not having you available for close consultation, somehow we will soldier on.

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